Pantology
Good government never depends upon laws, but upon the personal qualities of those who govern. The machinery of government is always subordinate to the will of those who administer that machinery. The most important element of government, therefore, is the method of choosing leaders.
Law and Governance, The Spacing Guild Manual. [Frank Herbert - Children of Dune]
School Board Election

I just sent this message to the candidates for my school district’s board election. 


I am sending this message to all 5 candidates for the DUSD Board.
I have one question I would like answered before I cast my ballot, if you don’t mind.
Are you committed to teaching SCIENCE in science classrooms (and willing to stand up to religious activists who want to force teachers to teach something silly like flying spaghetti monsters)

[In case you don’t know the FSM reference:http://www.venganza.org/about/open-letter/ ]

If science were explained to the average person in a way that is accessible and exciting, there would be no room for pseudoscience.
Carl Sagan, “The Burden of Skepticism” (via soycrates)
Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristocratic forms. No government in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, government tends more and more to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class — whether that class be hereditary royalty, oligarchs of financial empires, or entrenched bureaucracy.
Politics as Repeat Phenomenon: Bene Gesserit Training Manual [Children of Dune by Frank Herbert]
Hope clouds observation.
Reverend Mother Gaius Helen Mohiam [Dune by Frank Herbert ]
Reason is the first victim of strong emotion.
Scytale [Dune Messiah by Frank Herbert ]
Often I must speak other than I think. That is called diplomacy.
Stillgar [Dune Messiah by Frank Herbert ]
The convoluted wording of legalisms grew up around the necessity to hide from ourselves the violence we intend toward each other. Between depriving a man of one hour from his life and depriving him of his life there exists only a difference of degree. You have done violence to him, consumed his energy. Elaborate euphemisms may conceal your intent to kill, but behind any use of power over another the ultimate assumption remains: “I feed on your energy.”
Addenda to Orders in Council The Emperor Paul Muad’dib [Dune Messiah by Frank Herbert]
Expect only what happens in the fight. That way you’ll never be surprised.
recollected from Duncan Idaho, the Swordsmaster of the Ginaz, by Paul. [Dune by Frank Herbert ]
The concept of progress acts as a protective mechanism to shield us from the terrors of the future.
Collected Sayings of Muad’Dib by the Princess Irulan [Dune by Frank Herbert ]
There existed no need on Caladan to build a physical paradise or a paradise of the mind — we could see the actuality all around us. And the price we paid was the price men have always paid for achieving a paradise in this life — we went soft, we lost our edge.
"Muad’Dib: Conversations" by the Princess Irulan. [Dune by Frank Herbert]
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Repost for Liberty!

currentsinbiology:

Gut Bacteria May Play a Role in Autism (Scientific American) 
Autism is primarily a disorder of the brain, but research suggests that as many as nine out of 10 individuals with the condition also suffer from gastrointestinal problems such as inflammatory bowel disease and “leaky gut.” The latter condition occurs when the intestines become excessively permeable and leak their contents into the bloodstream. Scientists have long wondered whether the composition of bacteria in the intestines, known as the gut microbiome, might be abnormal in people with autism and drive some of these symptoms. Now a spate of new studies supports this notion and suggests that restoring proper microbial balance could alleviate some of the disorder’s behavioral symptoms.
At the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology held in May in Boston, researchers at Arizona State University reported the results of an experiment in which they measured the levels of various microbial by-products in the feces of children with autism and compared them with those found in healthy children. The levels of 50 of these substances, they found, significantly differed between the two groups. And in a 2013 study published in PLOS ONE, Italian researchers reported that, compared with healthy kids, those with autism had altered levels of several intestinal bacterial species, including fewer Bifidobacterium, a group known to promote good intestinal health.
One open question is whether these microbial differences drive the development of the condition or are instead a consequence of it. A study published in December 2013 in Cell supports the former idea. When researchers at the California Institute of Technology incited autismlike symptoms in mice using an established paradigm that involved infecting their mothers with a viruslike molecule during pregnancy, they found that after birth, the mice had altered gut bacteria compared with healthy mice. By treating the sick rodents with a health-promoting bacterium called Bacteroides fragilis, the researchers were able to attenuate some, but not all, of their behavioral symptoms. The treated mice had less anxious and stereotyped behaviors and became more vocally communicative.
Bacteroides fragilis Credit: CNRI/SCIENCE SOURCE

currentsinbiology:

Gut Bacteria May Play a Role in Autism (Scientific American)

Autism is primarily a disorder of the brain, but research suggests that as many as nine out of 10 individuals with the condition also suffer from gastrointestinal problems such as inflammatory bowel disease and “leaky gut.” The latter condition occurs when the intestines become excessively permeable and leak their contents into the bloodstream. Scientists have long wondered whether the composition of bacteria in the intestines, known as the gut microbiome, might be abnormal in people with autism and drive some of these symptoms. Now a spate of new studies supports this notion and suggests that restoring proper microbial balance could alleviate some of the disorder’s behavioral symptoms.

At the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology held in May in Boston, researchers at Arizona State University reported the results of an experiment in which they measured the levels of various microbial by-products in the feces of children with autism and compared them with those found in healthy children. The levels of 50 of these substances, they found, significantly differed between the two groups. And in a 2013 study published in PLOS ONE, Italian researchers reported that, compared with healthy kids, those with autism had altered levels of several intestinal bacterial species, including fewer Bifidobacterium, a group known to promote good intestinal health.

One open question is whether these microbial differences drive the development of the condition or are instead a consequence of it. A study published in December 2013 in Cell supports the former idea. When researchers at the California Institute of Technology incited autismlike symptoms in mice using an established paradigm that involved infecting their mothers with a viruslike molecule during pregnancy, they found that after birth, the mice had altered gut bacteria compared with healthy mice. By treating the sick rodents with a health-promoting bacterium called Bacteroides fragilis, the researchers were able to attenuate some, but not all, of their behavioral symptoms. The treated mice had less anxious and stereotyped behaviors and became more vocally communicative.

Bacteroides fragilis
Credit: CNRI/SCIENCE SOURCE

(via Terminal Lance - Terminal Lance “Unleash the Kraken”)